Including LGBTIQA+ and gender diverse peoples

Author:
RDI Network
Date:
August 2021
5 min read

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer, asexual and questioning peoples (LGBTIQA+), as well as, gender diverse peoples in our current development settings face social, legal and political inequalities as a result of deeply rooted norms and identity based stigma. Discrimination, violence and exclusion on the basis of their sexual orientation and gender identity violates their human rights, and also have a negative impact in terms of financial security, health, education and daily wellbeing.
Understanding the challenges will help create a more inclusive international development sector to ensure the rights and needs of LGBTQIA+ and gender diverse people are addressed in workplaces, programs, evaluations, and policies. 

  • Addressing the needs and rights for LGBTIQA+ and gender diverse peoples is key to ensuring that development doesn’t leave anyone behind. While LGBTIQA+ and gender diverse people are represented in the communities that development organisations work in, they are often excluded from development and humanitarian programs. International development organisations have a role to play in consulting with diverse LGBTIA+ movements, and mainstreaming LGBTQIA+ issues in development programs and policies.
  • LGBTIQA+ and gender diverse peoples experiences of marginalisation depend on context and the intersection of diverse SOGIESC and ethnicity, disability, gender, faith and class. People with disabilities and SOGIESC may be overlooked by disability and SOGIESC inclusion efforts. Lesbians, bi women and trans people (LBT) are marginalized within both the LGBTIQA+ and women’s movement.
  • However, LGBTQIA+ development workers also face discrimination within the international development sector. International development organisations may neglect the rights of LGBTQIA+ staff working in contexts that are hostile to SOGIESC, out of concern for how they will be received by local staff or the risks faced. Development organisations can support LGBTQIA+ staff by building more inclusive workplaces. This can take the form of more inclusive policies and training in equality and diversity for local and international staff.

Creating a more inclusive international development sector, will also help to ensure the rights and needs of LGBTQIA+ and gender diverse people are addressed in the design and delivery of development programs.
 
 
 
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